860-684-4251


201 Chestnut Hill Road
Stafford Springs, CT 06076

"I had a terrific experience in Radiology. Linda was great, and Beth made me feel comfortable and safe; she was efficient and gave great instructions in a calm manner."

At Evergreen Health Care Center, we treat people as if they are a part of our own family. Our comprehensive short term and long term care options include rehabilitation, hospice care, intravenous therapies, wound care, respite care and so much more.

205 Chestnut Hill Road | Stafford Springs | 860.684.6341

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JMMC Diagnostic Imaging

X-rays

  • Abdominal X-ray
  • Chest X-ray
  • Extremity X-ray
  • Facial X-ray
  • Skull X-ray
  • Spinal X-ray

Fluoroscopy

  • Arthrogram (Joint X-ray
  • Barium Enema
  • Esophagram
  • Small Bowel Series
  • Upper Gastrointestinal Series

CT SCAN

  • Angiography
  • Chest
  • Abdomen
  • Pelvis
  • Extremities
  • Head

Ultrasound

  • Abdominal X-ray
  • Obstetrical (pregnancy) Ultrasound
  • Pelvic/Gyn Ultrasound
  • Renal Ultrasound
  • Leg or Arm Venous Doppler
  • Testicular/Scrotal
  • Thyroid

MRI/MRA

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Angiography (MRA)

Mammography

  • Screening Mammogram
  • Diagnostic Mammogram
  • Breast Biopsy
  • DEXA

Nuclear Medicine

  • Bone Scan
  • Gastric Emptying Study
  • Hepatobiliary (HIDA) Scan
  • Stress Test
  • Thyroid and Thyroid Uptake Scans
  • Captopril Renal Scan

FOR ALL PATIENTS

PLEASE BRING A LIST OF ALL MEDICATIONS AND DOSAGES (including over-the-counter medicines, herbal supplements and vitamins) WITH YOU TO YOUR APPOINTMENT.

FOR CHILDREN AND DIABETICS, CONTACT RADIOLOGY AT (860) 684-8170 OR (860) 749-2201 EXT. 8170.

Location:
Johnson Memorial Hospital
201 Chestnut Hill Road
Stafford Springs, CT 06082
860-684-8170
Get Directions
Location:
Johnson Surgery Center
148 Hazard Avenue
Enfield, CT 06082
860-763-7651
Get Directions
Contacts:
Karl P. Kamyk
MBA, BS, RT(R)(CT)
Interim Director of Radiology
(860) 684-8173
Karl.Kamyk@jmmc.com
CT SCAN - Computerized Tomography
X-Rays

A computerized tomography (CT or CAT) scan allows doctors to get a detailed view of the structures inside your body including bones, organs, blood vessels and muscles without performing surgery. Noninvasive and painless, a CT scan captures and combines multiple X-ray images to produce a cross-sectional view of your body’s internal structures. The spiral CT scanners we use provide 3-D views of many areas of the body. A CT scan can be used to study all or parts of the body such as chest, abdomen, head, extremities and pelvis as well as the liver, pancreas, intestines, kidneys, bladder, adrenal glands, and lungs.

JMMC Radiology performs the following CT SCAN procedures:

  • Computerized Tomography
  • Chest
  • Abdomen
  • Pelvis
  • Extremities
  • Head

How to Prepare for Your CT SCAN Examination

It is very important that you stay very still for your CT exam. During the exam, you will be alone in the scanner room, but the technologist is able to see you through a window, and using microphones, you and the technologist are able to communicate with one another at all times. The usual time for a CT scan procedure is 30 minutes to 1 hour. Once placed in the CT unit, you will lie on your back on a cushioned table. The CT scanner resembles a “donut” or “ring” shape and only the part of your body to be examined is placed in the machine.

Your doctor may order your CT scan performed with barium contrast material and/or intravenous (IV) contrast dye, or without oral contrast media. If your doctor orders contrast material intravenously for your exam, the technologist will performed the administration. Oral contrast and dosage instructions must be obtained at least 24 hours prior to your exam, and are available at the Radiology Departments of Johnson Memorial Medical Center and the Johnson Surgery Center.

If the exam ordered is to be performed without contrast material no fasting is required. For exams ordered with contrast material, do not eat or drink 4 hours prior to the exam. You may take any current medications as you would normally with a small amount of water. For your convenience, elastic pants and no unwire bras are recommended.

Your doctor may schedule your CT scan exam by contacting the Johnson Memorial Medical Hospital Scheduling Department at (860) 684-8555.
Preparing for Your Exam
Fluoroscopy
Though X-ray technology has been around for several decades, it remains the most commonly used form of diagnostic imaging and an excellent tool for viewing internal body structures. X-rays include still shots
of parts of the body and motion images, or fluoroscopy. X-rays are a form of radiation, similar to light or radio waves, focused into a beam, like a flashlight beam. X-rays can pass through most objects including the human body. X-rays make a picture by striking a detector that either exposes a film or sends the picture to a computer. Dense tissues in the body, such as bone, block (absorb) many of the X-rays and look white on an X-ray. Less dense tissues, such as muscles and organs, block fewer of the X-rays (more of the X-rays pass through) and look like shades of gray on an X-ray. X-rays that pass mostly through air, such as through the lungs, look black on the picture.

An X-ray is a non-invasive medical test that exposes parts of the body to a small dose of radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-ray services are available at the Johnson Surgical Center and
the Johnson Memorial Medical Center.

In many instances, X-ray technology is all that your doctor will need to make a diagnosis, but the images it produces are not as clear as those captured with a CT scanner or MRI. For this reason, your doctor may
order an X-ray first and then follow up with additional diagnostic imaging tests.

FOR ALL PATIENTS

PLEASE BRING A LIST OF ALL MEDICATIONS AND DOSAGES (including over-the-counter medicines, herbal supplements and vitamins) WITH YOU TO YOUR APPOINTMENT. FOR CHILDREN AND DIABETICS, CONTACT RADIOLOGY AT (860) 684-8170 OR (860) 749-2201 EXT. 8170.
Mammography
Mammography
Mammography is an X-ray of the breasts used to screen for breast cancer. Mammograms can find tumors too small for you or your doctor to feel. Breast cancer is most easily treated and cured when it is discovered in an early stage. The American Cancer Society recommends that women 40 years and older have a mammogram annually.

Your doctor may order your exam at Johnson Memorial Outpatient Radiology in Enfield, CT. Our facility offers digital imaging for immediate image preview of your pictures and overall image enhancement. Digital mammography allows our radiologists a superior method for examining breast tissue in greater detail with the use of computer-aided-detection (CDC). This technology helps the radiologist detect any regions of interest on your pictures to determine if additional imaging is required.

In some instances, you may be asked to return to our facility for an additional picture. Try not to become alarmed as at times previous images may be obscured by overlapping breast tissue or tiny calcifications, and another view is necessary to see the area more clearly.

You may experience some discomfort due to the compression element of this exam. Compression is important because it increases detail, helps distinguish between masses, cysts, and tumors, separates breast tissues for clarity, prevents motion, and reduces radiation dose.

Your screening mammogram is usually interpreted by our radiologist the next business day. If your results are normal (negative), you will receive a letter by mail within 5 to 10 days confirming your results and recommending continued annual screenings. Your mammogram report will be sent to your doctor.

The type of mammogram your doctor recommends depends on your medical history and any symptoms you may be experiencing.
MRI/MRA
MRI/MRA

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable diagnostic tool that provides a noninvasive way for your doctor to see the internal structures of your body using radio waves inside a magnetic field. MRI exams are particularly useful for viewing conditions involving soft tissue that might be obscured by bone in X-ray exams, ultrasound and CT Scans. An MRI exam is performed using a large machine that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy. Once you are placed inside the magnet, either your entire body or a part of your body, the strong magnetic field generates images of organs and tissues to locate disease, infection, a tumor, and tissue damage. An MRA uses MRI technology to provide your doctor with images of blood vessels inside your body. In some cases contrast material may be used during the MRI scan to enhance certain structures more clearly in the pictures. The contrast material may be used to visualize blood flow, a tumor, and areas of inflammation or infection.

How to Prepare for Your Examination:

An MRI exam usually takes 30 to 60 minutes, but can last as long as 2 hours. Before your MRI exam, tell your doctor and the MRI technologist if you are:
  • Allergic to any medicines
  • Pregnant
  • Have any metal implanted in your body
  • Have heart or blood vessel devices (artery stent, pacemaker, infusion pump, cochlear implant)
  • Have metal pins, clips, metal parts in your body including artificial limbs, dental work, and braces
  • Have cosmetic metal including tattooed eyeliner
  • Wear an IUD
  • Have had recent blood vessel surgery
  • Wear medicine patches
  • Have other health conditions (kidney disease, sickle cell anemia)
  • Become nervous in confined spaces. You must lie very still during an MRI exam and may need
    medicine to help you relax. If you so elect to have a medicinal sedative, you may need to arrange a
    ride home after the exam.

Your doctor may order your MRI without contrast or with intravenous contrast dye. If your doctor has requested a Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), do not eat or drink anything for 4 hours prior to your exam. For all other MRI exams no fasting is necessary.Prior to the exam, you will need to remove all metal objects such as body piercings, hearing aids, dentures, jewelry, watches, coins and cards (ATM or credit cards), and hair accessories from your body. Before your exam you will remove all or most of your clothing depending on the area to be examined and receive a gown to wear. During the exam you will lie on your back on a table that is part of the MRI scanner. Your head, chest, and arms may be held with straps to help you remain completely still. Once inside the unit, you will hear a fan (and feel air moving), and tapping or snapping noises as the machine scans. As the exam begins, you will be alone in the room, but the technologist is able to see you through a window, and using microphones, you and the technologist can communicate at all times. You may be given breathing instructions as the scan proceeds. If contrast material is needed, it is administered intravenously (IV), as is glucagon used to slow bowel movements for some MRI exams.

MRI Exams

  • Abdomen
  • Breast
  • Head
  • Knee
  • Shoulder
  • Spine

Your doctor may schedule your MRI exam by contacting the Johnson Memorial Medical Hospital Scheduling Department at (860) 684-8555.
Nuclear Medicine
Since the 1950’s, Nuclear medicine has been a recognized medical specialty utilizing imaging techniques that give a unique view of your body’s internal systems, digestive, skeletal, pulmonary, cardiovascular, etc., and its functions such as organ performance, blood flow, and absorption of minerals. The difference between nuclear medicine and other imaging techniques is the nuclear scanner’s ability to detect radiation coming from inside the body instead of radiation from an outside source. During the exam you will lie on your back on a special scanning table. While images are taken, it is important that you remain completely still. The average duration for your exam depends on the type of exam your doctor has ordered.

Nuclear Medical Exams:



Bone Scan Preparation

Gastric Emptying Scan Preparation

Hepatobiliary (HIDA) Scan Preparation

Cardiolite Stress Test / Lexiscan Stress Test Preparation

Thyroid Scan Preparation

Thyroid Uptake and Scan (2 Day Exam) Preparation

Captopril Renal Scan (2 Day Exam) Preparation
Ultrasound
Ultrasound offers your doctor a simple, safe and painless diagnostic tool that uses high-frequency sound waves and their echoes to create real-time images of tissue, muscles, tendons, organs, and blood flow. Also called a sonogram, an ultrasound test allows your doctor to create images of body functions in motion including the visualization of a moving fetus in the womb. Your doctor may order a specialized ultrasound exam for a detailed evaluation of specific organs such as the kidneys, abdominal aorta, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, and upper and lower extremities.

During the exam you will either lie on your back, stomach or side(s) on a padded exam table. Warmed gel is spread on the body part to be examined to improve the quality of the sound waves. A small hand held unit called a transducer intercepts the sound waves when it is gently pressed against your skin. Ultrasound is not usually painful unless the transducer’s slight pressure is in contact with a more sensitive area. You will not hear or feel the sound waves. It is important that you lie very still while the ultrasound exam is performed. The sonographer might give you breathing instructions to help render the best pictures.

Ultrasound Exams

  • Abdominal
  • Breast
  • Doppler
  • Fetal
  • Pelvic
  • Testicular
  • Thyroid and Parathyroid
  • Vascular

How to Prepare for your Examination:

Tell your doctor if you have had a barium contrast enema or an upper gastrointestinal (UGI) contrast exam series within the past 2 days. Barium contrast material that remains in the intestines may interfere with the ultrasound exam results. You will need to remove any jewelry and all or most of your clothing depending on the exam, and will be given a gown to wear during the exam. Please allow 1 hour for your ultrasound exam.

Abdominal Ultrasound Preparation

Obstetrical (Pregnancy) Ultrasound Preparation

Pelvic/ Gyn Ultrasound Preparation

Renal (Kidneys and Bladder) Preparation

SOME ULTRASOUND PREPARATIONS ARE SPECIFIC TO THE EXAM YOUR DOCTOR HAS ORDERED FOR YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT THE JOHNSON MEMORIAL MEDICAL CENTER RADIOLOGY DEPARTMENT AT (860) 684-8170
X-Rays
X-Rays

Though X-ray technology has been around for several decades, it remains the most commonly used form of diagnostic imaging and an excellent tool for viewing internal body structures. X-rays include still shots
of parts of the body and motion images, or fluoroscopy. X-rays are a form of radiation, similar to light or radio waves, focused into a beam, like a flashlight beam. X-rays can pass through most objects including the human body. X-rays make a picture by striking a detector that either exposes a film or sends the picture to a computer. Dense tissues in the body, such as bone, block (absorb) many of the X-rays and look white on an X-ray. Less dense tissues, such as muscles and organs, block fewer of the X-rays (more of the X-rays pass through) and look like shades of gray on an X-ray. X-rays that pass mostly through air, such as through the lungs, look black on the picture.

An X-ray is a non-invasive medical test that exposes parts of the body to a small dose of radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-ray services are available at the Johnson Surgical Center and
the Johnson Memorial Medical Center.

In many instances, X-ray technology is all that your doctor will need to make a diagnosis, but the images it produces are not as clear as those captured with a CT scanner or MRI. For this reason, your doctor may
order an X-ray first and then follow up with additional diagnostic imaging tests.

FOR ALL PATIENTS

PLEASE BRING A LIST OF ALL MEDICATIONS AND DOSAGES (including over-the-counter medicines, herbal supplements and vitamins) WITH YOU TO YOUR APPOINTMENT. FOR CHILDREN AND DIABETICS, CONTACT RADIOLOGY AT (860) 684-8170 OR (860) 749-2201 EXT. 8170.